How to go extinct by mating too much: population consequences of male mate choice and efficiency in a sexual–asexual species complex

@article{Heubel2009HowTG,
  title={How to go extinct by mating too much: population consequences of male mate choice and efficiency in a sexual–asexual species complex},
  author={Katja U Heubel and Daniel J. Rankin and Hanna Kokko},
  journal={Oikos},
  year={2009},
  volume={118},
  pages={513-520}
}
Selection acting on individuals is not predicted to maximize population persistence, yet examples that explicitly quantify conflicts between individual and population level benefits are scarce. One such conflict occurs over sexual reproduction because of the cost of sex: sexual populations that suffer the cost of producing males have only half the growth rate compared to asexuals. Male behaviour can additionally impact population dynamics in a variety of ways, and here we study an example where… 

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