How to get the snowball rolling and extend the franchise: voting on the Great Reform Act of 1832

@article{Aidt2013HowTG,
  title={How to get the snowball rolling and extend the franchise: voting on the Great Reform Act of 1832},
  author={Toke S. Aidt and Raphael Franck},
  journal={Public Choice},
  year={2013},
  volume={155},
  pages={229-250}
}
This paper suggests a new approach to analyzing the causes of franchise extension. Based on a new dataset, it provides a detailed econometric study of the Great Reform Act of 1832 in the United Kingdom. The analysis yields four main results. First, modernization theory receives limited support. Second, the reform enjoyed some measure of popular support. Third, the threat of revolution had an asymmetric impact on the voting behavior of the pro-reform Whigs and the anti-reform Tories. While the… Expand

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