How to be a fig wasp.

@article{Weiblen2002HowTB,
  title={How to be a fig wasp.},
  author={George D. Weiblen},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2002},
  volume={47},
  pages={
          299-330
        }
}
  • G. Weiblen
  • Published 2002
  • Biology
  • Annual review of entomology
In the two decades since Janzen described how to be a fig, more than 200 papers have appeared on fig wasps (Agaonidae) and their host plants (Ficus spp., Moraceae). Fig pollination is now widely regarded as a model system for the study of coevolved mutualism, and earlier reviews have focused on the evolution of resource conflicts between pollinating fig wasps, their hosts, and their parasites. Fig wasps have also been a focus of research on sex ratio evolution, the evolution of virulence… 

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Are nematodes costly to fig tree–fig wasp mutualists?
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The results showed that Ficophagus microcarpus (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) was the only nematode in F.microcarpa, and in G. hispida, Martininema guangzhouensis was the dominant nematodes species, whereas FICophagus centerae was rare.
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