How to Treat Blunt Kidney Ruptures: Primary Open Surgery or Conservative Treatment with Deferred Surgery When Necessary?

@article{Danuser2000HowTT,
  title={How to Treat Blunt Kidney Ruptures: Primary Open Surgery or Conservative Treatment with Deferred Surgery When Necessary?},
  author={Hansj{\"o}rg Danuser and Sebastian Wille and G. Z{\"o}scher and Urs E Studer},
  journal={European Urology},
  year={2000},
  volume={39},
  pages={9 - 14}
}
Objective: We analyzed two consecutive series of 69 and 34 patients, respectively, with kidney ruptures covering two time periods with different treatment strategies to assess whether outcome is better after initial surgical or initial conservative treatment. Methods: One hundred and three patients with blunt kidney ruptures grade 2–4 (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma) excluding patients with pedicle injuries of the main renal vessels were evaluated. In the first time period, 1973… 

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