How to Administer the Initial Preference Task

@article{Stieger2012HowTA,
  title={How to Administer the Initial Preference Task},
  author={Stefan Stieger and Martin Voracek and Anton K. Formann},
  journal={European Journal of Personality},
  year={2012},
  volume={26},
  pages={63 - 78}
}
Individuals like their name letters more than non–name letters. This effect has been termed the Name Letter Effect (NLE) and is widely exploited to measure implicit (i.e. automatic, unconscious) self–esteem, predominantly by means of the Initial Preference Task (IPT). Methodological research on how to best administer the IPT is, however, scarce. In order to bridge this gap, the present paper assessed the advantages and disadvantages of different types of IPT administrations with two meta… Expand

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