How the worm got its pharynx: phylogeny, classification and Bayesian assessment of character evolution in Acoela.

@article{Jondelius2011HowTW,
  title={How the worm got its pharynx: phylogeny, classification and Bayesian assessment of character evolution in Acoela.},
  author={Ulf Jondelius and Andreas Wallberg and Matthew D. Hooge and Olga I. Raikova},
  journal={Systematic biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={60 6},
  pages={
          845-71
        }
}
Acoela are marine microscopic worms currently thought to be the sister taxon of all other bilaterians. Acoels have long been used as models in evolutionary scenarios, and generalized conclusions about acoel and bilaterian ancestral features are frequently drawn from studies of single acoel species. There is no extensive phylogenetic study of Acoela and the taxonomy of the 380 species is chaotic. Here we use two nuclear ribosomal genes and one mitochondrial gene in combination with 37… 
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