How the brain processes social information: searching for the social brain.

@article{Insel2004HowTB,
  title={How the brain processes social information: searching for the social brain.},
  author={Thomas R. Insel and Russell D. Fernald},
  journal={Annual review of neuroscience},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={
          697-722
        }
}
  • T. Insel, R. Fernald
  • Published 24 June 2004
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Annual review of neuroscience
Because information about gender, kin, and social status are essential for reproduction and survival, it seems likely that specialized neural mechanisms have evolved to process social information. This review describes recent studies of four aspects of social information processing: (a) perception of social signals via the vomeronasal system, (b) formation of social memory via long-term filial imprinting and short-term recognition, (c) motivation for parental behavior and pair bonding, and (d… 

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