How the FLOSS Research Community Uses Email Archives

@article{Squire2012HowTF,
  title={How the FLOSS Research Community Uses Email Archives},
  author={Megan Squire},
  journal={Int. J. Open Source Softw. Process.},
  year={2012},
  volume={4},
  pages={37-59}
}
  • Megan Squire
  • Published 2012
  • Computer Science
  • Int. J. Open Source Softw. Process.
Artifacts of the software development process, such as source code or emails between developers, are a frequent object of study in empirical software engineering literature. One of the hallmarks of free, libre, and open source software (FLOSS) projects is that the artifacts of the development process are publicly-accessible and therefore easily collected and studied. Thus, there is a long history in the FLOSS research community of using these artifacts to gain understanding about the phenomenon… 

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