How the Chinese Government Fabricates Social Media Posts for Strategic Distraction, Not Engaged Argument

@article{King2017HowTC,
  title={How the Chinese Government Fabricates Social Media Posts for Strategic Distraction, Not Engaged Argument},
  author={Gary King and Jennifer Pan and Margaret E. Roberts},
  journal={American Political Science Review},
  year={2017},
  volume={111},
  pages={484 - 501}
}
The Chinese government has long been suspected of hiring as many as 2 million people to surreptitiously insert huge numbers of pseudonymous and other deceptive writings into the stream of real social media posts, as if they were the genuine opinions of ordinary people. Many academics, and most journalists and activists, claim that these so-called 50c party posts vociferously argue for the government’s side in political and policy debates. As we show, this is also true of most posts openly… 
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