How the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Shaped Economic Activity in the American West

@article{Ager2020HowT1,
  title={How the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Shaped Economic Activity in the American West},
  author={Philipp Ager and Katherine Amelia Eriksson and Casper Worm Hansen and Lars L{\o}nstrup},
  journal={Urban Economics \& Regional Studies eJournal},
  year={2020}
}
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