How stress management improves quality of life after treatment for breast cancer.

@article{Antoni2006HowSM,
  title={How stress management improves quality of life after treatment for breast cancer.},
  author={Michael H Antoni and Suzanne C. Lechner and Aisha Kazi and Sarah R. Wimberly and Tammy Sifre and Kenya R. Urcuyo and Kristin M. Phillips and Stefan Glück and Charles S Carver},
  journal={Journal of consulting and clinical psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={74 6},
  pages={
          1143-52
        }
}
The range of effects of psychosocial interventions on quality of life among women with breast cancer remains uncertain. Furthermore, it is unclear which components of multimodal interventions account for such effects. To address these issues, the authors tested a 10-week group cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention among 199 women newly treated for nonmetastatic breast cancer, following them for 1 year after recruitment. The intervention reduced reports of social disruption and… 

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