How queen and workers share in male production in the stingless bee Melipona subnitida Ducke (Apidae, Meliponini)

@article{Koedam2004HowQA,
  title={How queen and workers share in male production in the stingless bee Melipona subnitida Ducke (Apidae, Meliponini)},
  author={Dirk Koedam and F. A. L. Contrera and Adriana de Oliveira Fidalgo and Vera Lucia Imperatriz-Fonseca},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2004},
  volume={52},
  pages={114-121}
}
Summary.Potential conflict between the queen and workers over the production of males is expected in stingless bees as a result of the higher relatedness of workers with their sons than with their brothers. This conflict was studied in Melipona subnitida by observing how the queen and the workers share in male production. The oviposition of individual cells was observed in two colonies with individually marked workers for a period of 51 and 40 days respectively. The gender that developed from… Expand

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