How much does quality of child care vary between health workers with differing durations of training? An observational multicountry study

@article{Huicho2008HowMD,
  title={How much does quality of child care vary between health workers with differing durations of training? An observational multicountry study},
  author={Luis Huicho and Robert W Scherpbier and Annette Mwansa Nkowane and Cesar Gomes Victora},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2008},
  volume={372},
  pages={910-916}
}
BACKGROUND Countries with high rates of child mortality tend to have shortages of qualified health workers. Little rigorous evidence has been done to assess how much the quality of care varies between types of health workers. We compared the performance of different categories of health workers who are trained in Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI). METHODS We analysed data obtained from first-level health facility surveys in Bangladesh (2003), Brazil (2000), Uganda (2002), and… Expand
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