How many melanomas might be prevented if more people applied sunscreen regularly?

@article{Olsen2018HowMM,
  title={How many melanomas might be prevented if more people applied sunscreen regularly?},
  author={Catherine M. Olsen and Louise Forsyth Wilson and Ad{\`e}le C. Green and N. Biswas and J. Loyalka and David C. Whiteman},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2018},
  volume={178}
}
Ultraviolet radiation causes cutaneous melanoma. Sunscreen prevents sunburn and protects skin cells against mutations. High‐quality epidemiological studies suggest regular sunscreen use prevents melanoma. 
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Objectives: To estimate the proportion and numbers of cancers occurring in Australia attributable to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and the proportion and numbers prevented by regular sun
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There is strong evidence that topical sunscreens, designed to protect against ultraviolet radiation (UVR)‐induced erythema, decrease the amount of UVR to which the skin is exposed, but their
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