How maize root volatiles affect the efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes in controlling the western corn rootworm?

@article{Hiltpold2009HowMR,
  title={How maize root volatiles affect the efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes in controlling the western corn rootworm?},
  author={Ivan Hiltpold and Stefan Toepfer and Ulrich Kuhlmann and Ted C. J. Turlings},
  journal={Chemoecology},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={155-162}
}
Because the ferocious maize pest Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte can adapt to all currently used control strategies, focus has turned to the development of novel, more sustainable control methods, such as biological control using entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN). A good understanding of the biology and behaviour of these potential control agents is essential for their successful deployment. Root systems of many maize varieties emit (E)-β-caryophyllene (EβC) in response to feeding by… 
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