How long does protection last? – In vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning imaging for the evaluation of the kinetics of a topically applied lotion in an everyday setting

@article{Sattler2012HowLD,
  title={How long does protection last? – In vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning imaging for the evaluation of the kinetics of a topically applied lotion in an everyday setting},
  author={Elke Sattler and Raphaela K{\"a}stle and Michaela Arens-Corell and Julia Welzel},
  journal={Skin Research and Technology},
  year={2012},
  volume={18}
}
Confocal laser scanning microscopic imaging is well established as a helpful diagnostic tool in dermatology. With a new generation of multi‐wave laser confocal microscopes now, in addition to the reflection mode, examinations with fluorescent agents are possible in vivo and ex vivo. Gathering details on the physical, chemical and kinetic features of different fluorophores in different vehicles in healthy skin in vivo will be of interest for therapeutic as well as cosmetic dermatology. 
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