How important are direct fitness benefits of sexual selection?

@article{Moller2014HowIA,
  title={How important are direct fitness benefits of sexual selection?},
  author={Ap Moller and Michael D. Jennions},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2014},
  volume={88},
  pages={401-415}
}
Females may choose mates based on the expression of secondary sexual characters that signal direct, material fitness benefits or indirect, genetic fitness benefits. Genetic benefits are acquired in the generation subsequent to that in which mate choice is performed, and the maintenance of genetic variation in viability has been considered a theoretical problem. Consequently, the magnitude of indirect benefits has traditionally been considered to be small. Direct fitness benefits can be… Expand
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