How emotion enhances the feeling of remembering

@article{Sharot2004HowEE,
  title={How emotion enhances the feeling of remembering},
  author={Tali Sharot and Mauricio R. Delgado and Elizabeth A. Phelps},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2004},
  volume={7},
  pages={1376-1380}
}
Studies examining memories of arousing 'real-life' events show that emotion heightens the feeling of remembering, without necessarily enhancing the objective accuracy of the memories. We measured brain activity associated with the feeling of remembering emotional and neutral photos. Subjects indicated whether recognition was accompanied by a recollection of details about the study episode ('remember') or not ('know'). 'Remember' judgments were boosted for emotional photos, but accuracy did not… 
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The neural circuitry underlying emotion's impact on memory and the subjective sense of recollection is examined to provide insight into this puzzling phenomenon and suggests that for emotional stimuli the quality and strength of memory for a few details may mediate judgments of recollection, whereas for neutral stimuli the quantity of contextual details may be more important.
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FMRI data provide strong evidence that engagement of some amygdalar regions can correspond with enhanced memory for certain types of details, but does not ensure successful encoding of all contextual details.
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The data suggest that emotion does not just bias participants to believe they have a vivid memory; rather, the arousal elicited by an event can benefit memory for some types of contextual details.
Emotional valence influences the neural correlates associated with remembering and knowing
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Results suggest that memories for negative items may be vividly recollected due to increased sensory processing during encoding, whereas enhanced gist-based processing of positive information may lead to increased feelings of familiarity.
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