How does practice reduce dual-task interference: integration, automatization, or just stage-shortening?

@article{Ruthruff2006HowDP,
  title={How does practice reduce dual-task interference: integration, automatization, or just stage-shortening?},
  author={Eric Ruthruff and Mark Van Selst and James C. Johnston and Roger W. Remington},
  journal={Psychological research},
  year={2006},
  volume={70 2},
  pages={125-42}
}
The present study assessed three hypotheses of how practice reduces dual-task interference: Practice teaches participants to efficiently integrate performance of a task pair; practice promotes automatization of individual tasks, allowing the central bottleneck to be bypassed; practice leaves the bottleneck intact but shorter in duration. These hypotheses were tested in two transfer-of-training experiments. Participants received one of three training types (Task 1 only, or Task 2 only, or dual… CONTINUE READING

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