How does anybody live in this strange place? A reply to Samantha Vice

@article{Benatar2012HowDA,
  title={How does anybody live in this strange place? A reply to Samantha Vice},
  author={David Benatar},
  journal={South African Journal of Philosophy},
  year={2012},
  volume={31},
  pages={619 - 631}
}
  • D. Benatar
  • Published 1 January 2012
  • Psychology
  • South African Journal of Philosophy
Abstract Samantha Vice has argued that ‘white’ South Africans are so tainted by the history of racial oppression in their country that they are incapable of attaining a great degree of moral virtue. She recommends that they should live in humility and political silence. There are a number of flaws in her argument. First, none of the characteristics of ‘white’ South Africans that she says provides the basis for these conclusions can distinguish (almost) all ‘white’ South Africans from (almost… 

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