How do you feel?

@article{Morrisj2002HowDY,
  title={How do you feel?},
  author={John S Morrisj},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2002},
  volume={6},
  pages={317-319}
}
  • John S Morrisj
  • Published 1 August 2002
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Does your heart pound because you feel afraid, or do you feel afraid because your heart is racing? This question is the crux of a century-old controversy, stemming from a proposal by William James. A recent neuroimaging study addresses this issue and suggests that the functional connectivity of the insula could provide the key to resolving the debate. 
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