How do weaponless male fiddler crabs avoid aggression?

@article{Booksmythe2009HowDW,
  title={How do weaponless male fiddler crabs avoid aggression?},
  author={Isobel Booksmythe and Richard N. C. Milner and Michael D. Jennions and Patricia Ruth Yvonne Backwell},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={64},
  pages={485-491}
}
Mimicry of females enables weaker males in many species to avoid intrasexual aggression. In fiddler crabs (Uca annulipes), males use their major claw in aggressive interactions to acquire and defend a territory. Males that have autotomised their major claw will be disadvantaged in fighting, but might use their temporary resemblance to females to avoid costly aggressive encounters with other males. We investigated whether: (1) courting males mistake clawless male fiddler crabs for females; (2… Expand

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