How do we remember the past in randomised strategies?

@inproceedings{Cristau2010HowDW,
  title={How do we remember the past in randomised strategies?},
  author={Julien Cristau and Claire David and Florian Horn},
  booktitle={GANDALF},
  year={2010}
}
Graph games of infinite length are a natural model for open reactive processes: one player represents the controller, trying to ensure a given specification, and the other represents a hostile environment. The evolution of the system depends on the decisions of both players, supplemented by chance. In this work, we focus on the notion of randomised strategy. More specifically, we show that three natural definitions may lead to very different results: in the most general cases, an almost-surely… Expand
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