How do glucocorticoids influence stress responses? Integrating permissive, suppressive, stimulatory, and preparative actions.

@article{Sapolsky2000HowDG,
  title={How do glucocorticoids influence stress responses? Integrating permissive, suppressive, stimulatory, and preparative actions.},
  author={Robert Morris Sapolsky and L. Michael Romero and Allan U. Munck},
  journal={Endocrine reviews},
  year={2000},
  volume={21 1},
  pages={
          55-89
        }
}
The secretion of glucocorticoids (GCs) is a classic endocrine response to stress. [] Key Result We find that GC actions fall into markedly different categories, depending on the physiological endpoint in question, with evidence for mediating effects in some cases, and suppressive or preparative in others. We then attempt to assimilate these heterogeneous GC actions into a physiological whole.

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