How choice affects and reflects preferences: revisiting the free-choice paradigm.

@article{Chen2010HowCA,
  title={How choice affects and reflects preferences: revisiting the free-choice paradigm.},
  author={M. Keith Chen and Jane L. Risen},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2010},
  volume={99 4},
  pages={
          573-94
        }
}
After making a choice between 2 objects, people reevaluate their chosen item more positively and their rejected item more negatively (i.e., they spread the alternatives). Since Brehm's (1956) initial free-choice experiment, psychologists have interpreted the spreading of alternatives as evidence for choice-induced attitude change. It is widely assumed to occur because choosing creates cognitive dissonance, which is then reduced through rationalization. In this article, we express concern with… Expand

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