How can the safety and diagnostic yield of percutaneous renal biopsies be optimized?

Abstract

DESIGN AND INTERVENTION Data from consecutive percutaneous native kidney biopsies that were carried out at a single Italian center from May 2003 to December 2005 using a formula to determine the depth of sampling were compared with data from consecutive biopsies performed at the same center before the introduction of the formula, during the period January 2001 to April 2003. The following mathematical formula was used: trigger depth (in cm) = (body weight [in kg × 10] ÷ height [in cm]) – 0.5. Severe clotting disorders, and renal failure accompanied by renal anatomical abnormality or longitudinal renal diameter <9 cm, were exclusion criteria. Patients underwent abdominal ultrasound and renal color-Doppler sonography before biopsy, in order to rule out the presence of cysts on the lower pole of the kidney, reduced renal size, or an accessory renal artery of the lower kidney pole. All biopsies were carried out using a realtime-ultrasound-guided freehand approach and a spring-loaded automated 14-gauge-needle biopsy gun. After biopsy, patients remained supine under observation for 24 h. Biopsies How can the safety and diagnostic yield of percutaneous renal biopsies be optimized?

DOI: 10.1038/ncpneph0700

Cite this paper

@article{Jennette2008HowCT, title={How can the safety and diagnostic yield of percutaneous renal biopsies be optimized?}, author={John Charles Jennette and Abhijit Kshirsagar}, journal={Nature Clinical Practice Nephrology}, year={2008}, volume={4}, pages={126-127} }