How can non-human primates inform evolutionary perspectives on female-biased kinship in humans?

@article{Thompson2019HowCN,
  title={How can non-human primates inform evolutionary perspectives on female-biased kinship in humans?},
  author={Melissa Emery Thompson},
  journal={Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences},
  year={2019},
  volume={374 1780},
  pages={
          20180074
        }
}
The rarity of female-biased kinship organization in human societies raises questions about ancestral hominin family structures. Such questions require grounding in the form and function of kin relationships in our close phylogenetic relatives, the non-human primates. Common features of primate societies, such as low paternity certainty and lack of material wealth, are consistent with features that promote matriliny in humans. In this review, I examine the role of kinship in three primate study… CONTINUE READING

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