How big is the proton? Particle-size puzzle leaps closer to resolution

@article{Castelvecchi2019HowBI,
  title={How big is the proton? Particle-size puzzle leaps closer to resolution},
  author={Davide Castelvecchi},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2019},
  volume={575},
  pages={269-270}
}
Precise measurement affirms that the particle’s radius is smaller than physicists once thought. Precise measurement affirms that the particle’s radius is smaller than physicists once thought. 
2 Citations
Revival of MOND or the Gravity Law without Universalism
In this note I argue that modified gravity can describe Dark Matter if one understands the modification of gravity as a tensor field Xμν = Xμν(t, x, y, z) in the Einstein equations, i.e. as an
Gravity Law without Universalism is Solving Many Tasks
My MOND proposal includes General Relativity as a special case, i.e. I have effects of General Relativity in many areas of spacetime. I argue that my proposal can describe Dark Matter as well if one

References

SHOWING 1-5 OF 5 REFERENCES
The size of the proton
TLDR
The root-mean-square charge radius, rp, has been determined with an accuracy of 2 per cent by electron–proton scattering experiments, and the present most accurate value of rp (with an uncertainty of 1 per cent) is given by the CODATA compilation of physical constants.
A measurement of the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and the proton charge radius
TLDR
A direct measurement of the n = 2 Lamb shift of atomic hydrogen determines the proton radius to be rp = 0.833 femtometers, which agrees with that obtained from the analogous muon-based Lamb shift measurement but is not consistent with the larger radius that was obtaining from the averaging of previous electron-based measurements.
A small proton charge radius from an electron–proton scattering experiment
TLDR
The smaller r p the authors have now measured supports the value found by two previous muonic hydrogen experiments, and agrees with the revised value for the Rydberg constant, one of the most accurately evaluated fundamental constants in physics.
New Measurement of the 1S-3S Transition Frequency of Hydrogen: Contribution to the Proton Charge Radius Puzzle.
We present a new measurement of the 1S-3S two-photon transition frequency of hydrogen, realized with a continuous-wave excitation laser at 205 nm on a room-temperature atomic beam, with a relative
I don’t think the puzzle is quite solved yet, but we made some big advances.
  • Phys. Rev. Lett. 120,
  • 2018