How and why do flying fish fly?

@article{Davenport2004HowAW,
  title={How and why do flying fish fly?},
  author={John Davenport},
  journal={Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries},
  year={2004},
  volume={4},
  pages={184-214}
}
  • J. Davenport
  • Published 1 June 1994
  • Environmental Science
  • Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries
Summary1.The review is concerned mainly with exocoetid flying fish, because little reliable information is available concerning other groups.2.Adult flying fish are of variable size (150–500 mm maximum length) and may be broadly divided into two categories: ‘two-wingers’ (e.g.Fodiator, Exocoetus, Parexocoetus) in which the enlarged pectoral fins make up most of the lifting surfaces, and ‘four-wingers’ (e.g.Cypsilurus, Hirundichthys) in which both pectoral and pelvic fins are hypertrophied.3.The… 

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