How alcohol industry organisations mislead the public about alcohol and cancer

@article{Petticrew2018HowAI,
  title={How alcohol industry organisations mislead the public about alcohol and cancer},
  author={M. Petticrew and N. Maani Hessari and C. Knai and E. Weiderpass},
  journal={Drug and Alcohol Review},
  year={2018},
  volume={37},
  pages={293–303}
}
INTRODUCTION AND AIMS Alcohol consumption increases the risk of several types of cancer, including several common cancers. As part of their corporate social responsibility activities, the alcohol industry (AI) disseminates information about alcohol and cancer. We examined the information on this which the AI disseminates to the public through its 'social aspects and public relations organizations' and related bodies. The aim of the study was to determine its comprehensiveness and accuracy… Expand
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