How Well Does Paternity Confidence Match Actual Paternity?

@article{Anderson2006HowWD,
  title={How Well Does Paternity Confidence Match Actual Paternity?},
  author={Kristen Anderson},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2006},
  volume={47},
  pages={513 - 520}
}
Evolutionary theory predicts that males will provide less parental investment for putative offspring who are unlikely to be their actual offspring. Crossculturally, paternity confidence (a mans assessment of the likelihood that he is the father of a putative child) is positively associated with mens involvement with children and with investment or inheritance from paternal kin. A survey of 67 studies reporting nonpaternity suggests that for men with high paternity confidence rates of… Expand
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Using self-reported data on paternity confidence in 3,360 pregnancies reported by men living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, it is found that low paternity confidence is more common among unmarried couples and for unplanned pregnancies, and that men are more likely not to state paternity confidence if a pregnancy is unplanned. Expand
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