How We See Them Versus How They See Themselves

@article{Lucea2010HowWS,
  title={How We See Them Versus How They See Themselves},
  author={Rafael Lucea},
  journal={Business \& Society},
  year={2010},
  volume={49},
  pages={116 - 139}
}
The present study complements current firm—nongovernment organization (NGO) literature by emphasizing the influence of managerial cognition on organizational behavior. In particular, I find that NGOs confront or seek to collaborate with other NGOs or with firms to appear as legitimate actors before selected third parties and as a way to access various sources of funds. By contrast, firm managers interacting with these NGOs are fundamentally concerned with achieving social stability so that… Expand

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