How Wartime Military Service Affects Children and Families

@article{Lester2013HowWM,
  title={How Wartime Military Service Affects Children and Families},
  author={P. Lester and Patricia Lieutenant Colonel Eric Flake},
  journal={The Future of Children},
  year={2013},
  volume={23},
  pages={121 - 141}
}
How are children’s lives altered when a parent goes off to war? What aspects of combat deployment are most likely to put children at risk for psychological and other problems, and what resources for resilience can they tap to overcome such hardships and thrive? To answer these questions, Patricia Lester and Lieutenant Colonel Eric Flake first examine the deployment cycle, a multistage process that begins with a period of anxious preparation after a family receives notice that a parent will be… Expand
Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for Military Families: Improving Relationships
The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been fought for more than a decade. During this time, approximately two million children have been impacted by parental deployment(s). The majority of theseExpand
Coparenting across the Deployment Cycle: Observations from Military Families with Young Children
Contemporary service members and their partners have adapted their coparenting to respond to the specific transitions and disruptions associated with wartime deployment cycles and evolving childExpand
Health and Mental Health Needs of Children in US Military Families
TLDR
This clinical report is for all pediatricians, both active duty and civilian, to aid in caring for children whose loved ones have been, are, or will be deployed. Expand
A clinician's guide to working with female veterans and their children
TLDR
This manual discusses mindfulness-based treatment interventions and practical tools to guide clinicians in aiding female veterans to prepare their children for deployment, cope with deployment, and reestablish the attachment bond upon returning home. Expand
Accumulation of Risk and Promotive Factors Among Young Children in US Military Families.
TLDR
Risk factors, particularly parental depression, community poverty, and cumulative risk, were more strongly associated with children's outcomes than promotive factors, and there was a significant risk-protective relationship between accumulations of risk and promotive Factors. Expand
Human–Animal Interaction as a Context for Thriving and Coping in Military-Connected Youth: The Role of Pets During Deployment
There are close to two million children who have parents serving in the United States military. Youth in military families face unique challenges, such as stress about family deployment.Expand
Afterword: What We Can Learn from Military Children and Families
TLDR
This commentary highlights lessons the authors can learn from military children and families that have the potential to help many families outside the military and suggests ways to build on those lessons through additional research and dissemination. Expand
Fighting for Family: Considerations of Work–Family Conflict in Military Service Member Parents
Abstract We review the state of the literature concerning work–family conflict in the military, focusing on service members’ parenting roles and overall family and child well-being. This includesExpand
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Military-Connected Families: The Relevance of a Family-Centered Approach.
TLDR
Gaps in the current continuum of behavioral health services for veterans with PTSD are identified, as well as efforts underway to develop trauma-informed, family-centered screening, prevention, and treatment approaches. Expand
Supporting America's Military Children and Families
Military children are our nation’s children and military families are our nation’s families. They serve courageously and their commitment and sense of duty is comparable to their military serviceExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 148 REFERENCES
Adjustment of Children and Youth in Military Families: Toward Developmental Understandings
Nearly, 2 million children in the United States live in military families. Throughout all branches of the U.S. military since September 11, 2001, ca 700,000 children have had or currently have aExpand
When a parent goes to war: effects of parental deployment on very young children and implications for intervention.
TLDR
This article reviews what is known about the effects of the military deployment cycle on young children, including attachment patterns, intense emotions, and behavioral changes and suggests an ecological approach for supporting military families with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Expand
Children on the Homefront: The Experience of Children From Military Families
TLDR
The health and well-being of children from military families from the perspectives of the child and nondeployed parent is described and families that experienced more total months of parental deployment may benefit from targeted support to deal with stressors that emerge over time. Expand
Wartime Deployment and Military Children: Applying Prevention Science to Enhance Family Resilience
During wartime, military families and children make extraordinary sacrifices for their country. This chapter reviews the impact of wartime deployments and parental combat-related mental healthExpand
Children's response to parental separation during operation desert storm.
TLDR
Generally, the factors shaping differential outcomes among children of deployed personnel do not differ from the variables affecting outcomes of children of nondeployed parents, however, boys and younger children appear to be especially vulnerable to deployment effects, and increased monitoring of these children is warranted. Expand
When a Parent Goes Off to War
TLDR
Findings suggest that parents need to be better prepared to handle the stresses after a deployed parent returns and that school personnel also need special training and schools need to offer additional opportunities for students to discuss deployment issues. Expand
Developmental issues impacting military families with young children during single and multiple deployments.
TLDR
It was found young children with a deployed parent showed increased behavior problems during deployment and increased attachment behaviors at reunion compared with children whose parents had not experienced a recent deployment. Expand
Effect of parents' wartime deployment on the behavior of young children in military families.
TLDR
This study is the first to show that children aged 3 years or older with a deployed parent exhibit increased behavioral symptoms compared with peers without a deployedparent after controlling for caregiver's stress and depressive symptoms. Expand
Effects of Soldiers' Deployment on Children's Academic Performance and Behavioral Health
TLDR
This research examines school-age children of soldiers in the Active force, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard, of all ranks, to assess academic effects and behavioral health challenges associated with parental deployment. Expand
Evaluation of a family-centered prevention intervention for military children and families facing wartime deployments.
TLDR
Evaluation data provided preliminary support for a strength-based, trauma-informed military family prevention program to promote resiliency and mitigate the impact of wartime deployment stress. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...