How Variations in Distance Affect Eyewitness Reports and Identification Accuracy

@article{Lindsay2008HowVI,
  title={How Variations in Distance Affect Eyewitness Reports and Identification Accuracy},
  author={Rod C. L. Lindsay and Carolyn Semmler and Nathan Weber and Neil Brewer and Marilyn R Lindsay},
  journal={Law and Human Behavior},
  year={2008},
  volume={32},
  pages={526-535}
}
Witnesses observe crimes at various distances and the courts have to interpret their testimony given the likely quality of witnesses’ views of events. We examined how accurately witnesses judged the distance between themselves and a target person, and how distance affected description accuracy, choosing behavior, and identification test accuracy. Over 1,300 participants were approached during normal daily activities, and asked to observe a target person at one of a number of possible distances… Expand

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