How To Elect a Leader Faster than a Tournament

@article{Alistarh2015HowTE,
  title={How To Elect a Leader Faster than a Tournament},
  author={Dan Alistarh and Rati Gelashvili and Adrian Vladu},
  journal={Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing},
  year={2015}
}
The problem of electing a leader from among n contenders is one of the fundamental questions in distributed computing. In its simplest formulation, the task is as follows: given n processors, all participants must eventually return a win or lose indication, such that a single contender may win. Despite a considerable amount of work on leader election, the following question is still open: can we elect a leader in an asynchronous fault-prone system faster than just running a Θ(log n)-time… Expand
Game-Theoretically Fair Leader Election in O(log log n) Rounds under Majority Coalitions
TLDR
This work is the first exploration of the round complexity of game- theoretically fair leader election in the presence of a possibly majority coalition, and suggests a new, approximate game-theoretic fairness notion, called “approximate sequential fairness”, which provides a more desirable solution concept than some previously studied approximate fairness notions. Expand
Game-Theoretic Fairness Meets Multi-party Protocols: The Case of Leader Election
TLDR
This work is the first exploration of the round complexity of game- theoretically fair leader election in the presence of a possibly majority coalition, and suggests a new, approximate game-theoretic fairness notion, called “approximate sequential fairness”, which provides a more desirable solution concept than some previously studied approximate fairness notions. Expand
Lower Bounds for Shared-Memory Leader Election under Bounded Write Contention
This paper gives tight logarithmic lower bounds on the solo step complexity of leader election in an asynchronous shared-memory model with single-writer multi-reader (SWMR) registers, for bothExpand
Why extension-based proofs fail
TLDR
This work introduces extension-based proofs, a class of impossibility proofs that are modelled as an interaction between a prover and a protocol and that include valency arguments. Expand
The Renaming Problem: Recent Developments and Open Questions

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES
Communication-efficient randomized consensus
TLDR
Overall, it is shown that it is possible to build an efficient message-passing implementation of a shared coin, and in the process (almost-optimally) solve the classic consensus problem in the asynchronous message-Passing model. Expand
Tight bounds for asynchronous randomized consensus
TLDR
This work proves that the total step complexity of randomized consensus is Θ(n2) in an asynchronous shared memory system using multi-writer multi-reader registers and improves both the lower and the upper bounds for this problem. Expand
How to Allocate Tasks Asynchronously
TLDR
The To-Do Tree concurrent data structure is introduced, which improves on the best known randomized and deterministic upper bounds and allows us to handle the complex dependencies between the processes' coin flips and their scheduling, and to tightly bound the work needed to perform subsets of the tasks. Expand
Tight Bounds for Asynchronous Renaming
TLDR
The first tight bounds on the time complexity of shared-memory renaming are presented, a fundamental problem in distributed computing in which a set of processes need to pick distinct identifiers from a small namespace, and new tight bounds for deterministic concurrent fetch-and-increment counters, queues, and stacks are implied. Expand
Adaptive randomized mutual exclusion in sub-logarithmic expected time
TLDR
This work presents a randomized adaptive mutual exclusion algorithms with O(log k/loglog k) expected amortized RMR complexity, even against a strong adversary, for the cache-coherent shared memory read/write model and establishes that sub-logarithmic adaptive Mutual exclusion, using reads and writes only, is possible. Expand
Renaming in an asynchronous environment
TLDR
This paper shows that problems of processor renaming can be solved even in the presence of up to up to 2 faulty processors, contradicting the widely held belief that no nontrivial problem can be solve in such a system. Expand
Optimal time randomized consensus—making resilient algorithms fast in practice
TLDR
This paper presents an optimally fast and highly resilient shared-memory randomized consensus algorithm that runs in only O(log n) expected time if @or less failures occur, and takes at most O(*) expected tim~ for any j. Expand
Randomized mutual exclusion in O(log N / log log N) RMRs
TLDR
This paper presents two strong-adversary randomized local-spin mutual exclusion algorithms that can be combined with a deterministic algorithm, such as [18], to obtain O(log N) worst-case RMR complexity and presents the upper bounds of these algorithms. Expand
Fast Randomized Test-and-Set and Renaming
TLDR
This work presents the first adaptive randomized renaming algorithm, and it improves on existing deterministic solutions by providing a smaller namespace, and by lowering step complexity. Expand
Another advantage of free choice (Extended Abstract): Completely asynchronous agreement protocols
TLDR
This work exhibits a probabilistic solution for this problem, which guarantees that as long as a majority of the processes continues to operate, a decision will be made (Theorem 1). Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...