How To Detect Grammatical Errors In A Text Without Parsing IT

@inproceedings{Atwell1987HowTD,
  title={How To Detect Grammatical Errors In A Text Without Parsing IT},
  author={E. Atwell},
  booktitle={EACL},
  year={1987}
}
  • E. Atwell
  • Published in EACL 1987
  • Computer Science
The Constituent Likelihood Automatic Word-tagging System (CLAWS) was originally designed for the low-level grammatical analysis of the million-word LOB Corpus of English text samples. CLAWS does not attempt a full parse, but uses a first-order Markov model of language to assign word-class labels to words. CLAWS can be modified to detect grammatical errors, essentially by flagging unlikely word-class transitions in the input text. This may seem to be an intuitively implausible and theoretically… Expand
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