Corpus ID: 146900821

How Milton Friedman came to Australia: a case study of class-based political business cycles. [An earlier version of this article was presented at the History of Economic Thought Society of Australia. Conference (18th: 2005: Macquarie University, Sydney).]

@article{Millmow2006HowMF,
  title={How Milton Friedman came to Australia: a case study of class-based political business cycles. [An earlier version of this article was presented at the History of Economic Thought Society of Australia. Conference (18th: 2005: Macquarie University, Sydney).]},
  author={A. Millmow and J. Courvisanos},
  journal={Journal of Australian Political Economy},
  year={2006},
  pages={112}
}
In this [inflationary] situation a powerful alliance is likely to be formed between big business and rentier interests, and they would probably find more than one economist to declare that the situation was manifestly unsound. The pressure of all these forces, and in particular of big business – as a rule influential in government departments – would induce the government to return to the orthodox policy of cutting down the budget deficit. (Kalecki, 1943 [1990: 355]) 

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 47 REFERENCES
Full Employment: Gift Horse or Trojan Horse?
Friedman's monetary framework: some lessons
Stagnation theory and stagnation policy
Investment Cycles in Capitalist Economies: A Kaleckian Behavioural Contribution
Do states optimize? Public capital and economic growth
Unemployment in Australia: Models, Myths and Mysteries
Profits, Variability of Profits and the Prices Justification Tribunal
Two Lucky People: Memoirs
...
1
2
3
4
5
...