How Many Hours Is Enough? An Old Profession Meets a New Generation

@article{Schroeder2004HowMH,
  title={How Many Hours Is Enough? An Old Profession Meets a New Generation},
  author={Steven A. Schroeder},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={140},
  pages={838-839}
}
  • S. Schroeder
  • Published 18 May 2004
  • Medicine
  • Annals of Internal Medicine
Sigmund Freud said that the two most important things in life are arbeit (work) and liebe (love)in that order. Three essays in this issue (1-3) address fundamental themes about work: How hard should one work? What does it mean to be a professional? How can one find meaning in work and still lead a full life? The catalyst for these essays is the 2002 ruling by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) that restricts residency work hours to less than 80 hours per weekon… 
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Mississippi burnout part II: satisfaction, autonomy and work/family balance.
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  • Psychology, Medicine
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