How Low Socioeconomic Status Affects 2-Year Hormonal Trajectories in Children

@article{Chen2010HowLS,
  title={How Low Socioeconomic Status Affects 2-Year Hormonal Trajectories in Children},
  author={Edith Chen and Sheldon Cohen and Gregory E. Miller},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={31 - 37}
}
Disparities by socioeconomic status (SES) are seen for numerous mental and physical illnesses, and yet understanding of the pathways to health disparities is limited. We tested whether SES alters longitudinal trajectories of cortisol output and what types of psychosocial factors could account for these links. Fifty healthy children collected saliva samples (four times per day for 2 days) at 6-month intervals for 2 years. At baseline, families were interviewed about SES and psychosocial factors… 
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