How Low Can You Go? Physical Production Mechanism of Elephant Infrasonic Vocalizations

@article{Herbst2012HowLC,
  title={How Low Can You Go? Physical Production Mechanism of Elephant Infrasonic Vocalizations},
  author={Christian T. Herbst and Angela S. Stoeger and Roland Frey and J{\"o}rg Lohscheller and Ingo R. Titze and Michaela Gumpenberger and W. Tecumseh Fitch},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={337},
  pages={595 - 599}
}
The Song of the Elephant In mammals, vocal sound production generally occurs in one of two ways, either through muscular control—as when a cat purrs or, more commonly, by air passing through the vocal folds—which occurs in humans and facilitates production of extremely high frequency bat calls. Over the past 20 years, it has been recognized that elephants can communicate through extremely low frequency infrasonic sounds. Taking advantage of a natural death of an elephant in a zoo, Herbst et al… Expand
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