How Empty Was the Tomb?

@article{Goodacre2021HowEW,
  title={How Empty Was the Tomb?},
  author={M. J. Goodacre},
  journal={Journal for the Study of the New Testament},
  year={2021},
  volume={44},
  pages={134 - 148}
}
  • M. Goodacre
  • Published 16 June 2021
  • Education
  • Journal for the Study of the New Testament
Although the term ‘empty tomb’ is endemic in contemporary literature, it is never used in the earliest Christian materials. The term makes little sense in the light of first-century Jerusalem tombs, which always housed multiple people. One absent body would not leave the tomb empty. The gospel narratives presuppose a large, elite tomb, with multiple loculi, and a heavy rolling stone to allow repeated access for multiple burials. The gospels therefore give precise directions about where Jesus… 

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