How Did Korean Get -l for Middle Chinese Words Ending in - t?

@article{Martin1997HowDK,
  title={How Did Korean Get -l for Middle Chinese Words Ending in - t?},
  author={S. Martin},
  journal={Journal of East Asian Linguistics},
  year={1997},
  volume={6},
  pages={263-271}
}
  • S. Martin
  • Published 1997
  • History
  • Journal of East Asian Linguistics
The Sino-Korean versions of the final labial and velar finalsof the Middle Chinese "entering" tone are -p and -k, but theapical -t of Middle Chinese is borrowed as -l and wasprescriptively treated as -LQ by the 15th-century Koreanorthographers. This is best explained by assuming that a liquidarticulation was used in the northern Chinese dialect thatKoreans used as a model. That articulation was probably a flap[r], and it was part of the general erosion of the final stopsthat led to their… Expand
5 Citations
Middle Korean ㅿ and the Cheju dialect*
  • J. Stonham
  • History
  • Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies
  • 2011
  • 2
Neutralization and anti-homophony in Korean1
  • 30
  • PDF
On the Yenisei Kirghiz title ā-rè*
  • 2
  • PDF

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES