How Cats Lap: Water Uptake by Felis catus

@article{Reis2010HowCL,
  title={How Cats Lap: Water Uptake by Felis catus},
  author={Pedro Morais Reis and Sunghwan Jung and Jeffrey M. Aristoff and Roman Stocker},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={330},
  pages={1231 - 1234}
}
Lap Cats We all know that domestic cats lap milk, but perhaps fewer of us have thought about how they do this. Reis et al. (p. 1231, published online 11 November; see the cover) have discovered that cats curl their tongues so that the top surface touches the water. Then, by lifting their tongues rapidly, a column of liquid grows by inertia until gravity induces its breakage and the cats close their jaws to capture the liquid. Lapping frequency is tuned to maximize the volume ingested, depending… 
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Comment on “How Cats Lap: Water Uptake by Felis catus”
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The revised analysis given here agrees with their observations and predicts a similar lapping frequency for cats and dogs.
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Some carnivorous mammals (e.g., cats and dogs) lap water with their tongues to drink water at high fre-quencies. Such a fast moving tongue creates a liquid column out of a bath which is bitten by the
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