How Big is a Hole?: The Problems of the Practical Application of Science in the Invention of the Miners’ Safety Lamp by Humphry Davy and George Stephenson in Late Regency England

@article{James2005HowBI,
  title={How Big is a Hole?: The Problems of the Practical Application of Science in the Invention of the Miners’ Safety Lamp by Humphry Davy and George Stephenson in Late Regency England},
  author={Frank A J L James},
  journal={Transactions of the Newcomen Society},
  year={2005},
  volume={75},
  pages={175 - 227}
}
  • F. James
  • Published 1 January 2005
  • History
  • Transactions of the Newcomen Society
(2005). How Big is a Hole?: The Problems of the Practical Application of Science in the Invention of the Miners’ Safety Lamp by Humphry Davy and George Stephenson in Late Regency England. Transactions of the Newcomen Society: Vol. 75, No. 2, pp. 175-227. 
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