How (Not) to Predict Elections

@article{Metaxas2011HowT,
  title={How (Not) to Predict Elections},
  author={Panagiotis Takis Metaxas and Eni Mustafaraj and Daniel Gayo-Avello},
  journal={2011 IEEE Third Int'l Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and 2011 IEEE Third Int'l Conference on Social Computing},
  year={2011},
  pages={165-171}
}
  • P. Metaxas, Eni Mustafaraj, Daniel Gayo-Avello
  • Published 1 October 2011
  • Political Science, Computer Science
  • 2011 IEEE Third Int'l Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and 2011 IEEE Third Int'l Conference on Social Computing
Using social media for political discourse is increasingly becoming common practice, especially around election time. Arguably, one of the most interesting aspects of this trend is the possibility of ''pulsing'' the public's opinion in near real-time and, thus, it has attracted the interest of many researchers as well as news organizations. Recently, it has been reported that predicting electoral outcomes from social media data is feasible, in fact it is quite simple to compute. Positive… Expand
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