Housing First for older homeless adults with mental illness: a subgroup analysis of the At Home/Chez Soi randomized controlled trial

@article{Chung2018HousingFF,
  title={Housing First for older homeless adults with mental illness: a subgroup analysis of the At Home/Chez Soi randomized controlled trial},
  author={Timothy Ernest Chung and Agnes Gozdzik and Luis Ivan Palma Lazgare and Matthew J To and Tim Aubry and James C. Frankish and Stephen W. Hwang and Vicky Stergiopoulos},
  journal={International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
  year={2018},
  volume={33},
  pages={85 - 95}
}
This study compares the effect of Housing First on older (≥50 years old) and younger (18–49 years old) homeless adults with mental illness participating in At Home/Chez Soi, a 24‐month multisite randomized controlled trial of Housing First. 
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TLDR
The unique characteristics of older homeless adults and the health and psychosocial supports required upon hospital discharge are examined.
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While experiences of later-life homelessness are known to vary, classification of shelter, housing and service models that meet the diverse needs of older people with experiences of homelessness
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