Household structure and childhood immunization in Niger and Nigeria

@article{Gage2011HouseholdSA,
  title={Household structure and childhood immunization in Niger and Nigeria},
  author={A. Gage and A. Sommerfelt and A. Piani},
  journal={Demography},
  year={2011},
  volume={34},
  pages={295-309}
}
In this study, we use data from the Demographic and Health Surveys to examine the relationship between household structure and childhood immunization in Niger and Nigeria. We show that household structure is an important determinant of childhood immunization in Nigeria: Children from nuclear, elementary polygynous, and three-generational households are worse-off than those from laterally extended households. However, the lower odds of full immunization among children from three-generational and… Expand

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