Household Enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa: Why They Matter for Growth, Jobs, and Livelihoods

@article{Fox2012HouseholdEI,
  title={Household Enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa: Why They Matter for Growth, Jobs, and Livelihoods},
  author={L. Fox and T. Sohnesen},
  journal={Development Economics: Regional \& Country Studies eJournal},
  year={2012}
}
  • L. Fox, T. Sohnesen
  • Published 2012
  • Business
  • Development Economics: Regional & Country Studies eJournal
Despite 40 percent of households relying on household enterprises (non-farm enterprises operated by a single individual or with the help of family members) as an income source, household enterprises are usually ignored in low-income Sub-Saharan-African development strategies. Yet analysis of eight countries shows that although the fast growing economies generated new private non-farm wage jobs at high rates, household enterprises generated most new jobs outside agriculture. Owing to the small… Expand
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Household Enterprises in Mozambique: Key to Poverty Reduction But Not on the Development Agenda?
Household enterprises -- usually one-person-operated tiny informal enterprises -- are a rapidly growing source of employment in Sub-Saharan Africa, especially in lower-income countries. HouseholdExpand
The Household Enterprise Sector in Tanzania: Why it Matters and Who Cares
The household enterprise sector has a significant role in the Tanzanian economy. It employs a larger share of the urban labor force than wage employment, and is increasingly seen as an alternative toExpand
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