Hot-blooded singers: endothermy facilitates crepuscular signaling in African platypleurine cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Platypleura spp.)

@article{Sanborn2003HotbloodedSE,
  title={Hot-blooded singers: endothermy facilitates crepuscular signaling in African platypleurine cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Platypleura spp.)},
  author={Allen F. Sanborn and Martin H. Villet and Polly K. Phillips},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2003},
  volume={90},
  pages={305-308}
}
The cicada genus Platypleura has a wide distribution across Africa and southern Asia. We describe endothermic thermoregulation in four South African species that show crepuscular signaling behavior. This is the first evidence of thermoregulation in platypleurine cicadas. Field measurements of body temperature (Tb) show that these animals regulate Tb through endogenous heat production. Maximum Tb measured was 22.1°C above ambient temperature during calling activity at dusk. The mean Tb during… 
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