Hot Springs, Cool Rivers, and Hidden Fires: Heracles in Catullus 68.51-66

@article{Vandiver2000HotSC,
  title={Hot Springs, Cool Rivers, and Hidden Fires: Heracles in Catullus 68.51-66},
  author={Elizabeth Vandiver},
  journal={Classical Philology},
  year={2000},
  volume={95},
  pages={151 - 159}
}
  • E. Vandiver
  • Published 1 April 2000
  • History
  • Classical Philology
E VEN AMONG CATULLUS' CARMINA MAIORA, 68 stands out as unusually convoluted, unusually dependent on similes and images that seem unconnected to the poem's main theme, unusually complex.' The basic narrative of the poem is simple to the point of banality; Denis Feeney sets the question, "What actually happens in 68?" and answers, "A man provides a house, a woman arrives-the rest is analogy and reflection, nested within the expression of thanks to Allius."2 Feeney's observation that the similes…